C#

When you're working in a software development team, you'll know that work can be very stressful at times. Too much stress is a bad sign and can wear people down or even cause burnouts. That's why it's important to keep track of metrics that address team well-being. In a previous post, I argued that the often-used team happiness metrics are unreliable. Happiness may be useful in certain instances, but it is highly subjective and tends to fluctuate by the day. That's why I proposed to measure an alternative metric; team morale. Team morale is based on scientifically validated scales…

This post is the second part in a series. For this first part, please check out this post. The purpose of this series is to show you some of the lessons I learned when I started using MVC, Entity Framework, dependency injection, unit testing and various design patterns. As with all new technologies, patterns and ideas, it takes a while to get comfortable with it and learn how to apply them in a good way. I believe that this is in part because tutorials often focus on the details of a technology or a pattern. Putting everything together is often…

I love Microsoft’s Entity Framework and the MVC framework. Put together, they make my work as a C# developer a lot easier because they take care of a lot of the heavy lifting. As a bonus, they help make my applications more structured, more easily testable and more fun to work on. But it took me a while to get where I wanted to be. As with all technologies, it takes a while to get comfortable with them and learn how to apply them in a good way. This is in part because most tutorials focus on the…

If I could recommend only a single book to (Agile) developers that want to improve their skills, it would be ‘Clean Code’ by Robert C. Martin (lovingly called Uncle Bob by the community). I’ve certainly read my share of books on writing code, but few books have had such a profound influence on how I write and think about code. In fact, I’ve made this book a pretty much mandatory read at NowOnline. If there’s any book out there that tells you how to avoid the buildup of technical debt, this book…

We've recently had to merge a version branch of a codebase back into the trunk. You see, two teams had been working on mostly separate parts of a system for three months. The result was quite painful. We lost several days on cursing, fixing merging- and tree conflicts, testing the code and working through new bugs. This bothered me quite a bit, not in the first place because I was the one cursing as I did most of the merge. But also because I felt that as a team, we were wasting precious time and money. I am quite…