Christiaan Verwijs

Scrum Master, Trainer, Developer & founder of Agilistic

Whatever technology you are using now, there is a good chance that it will be irrelevant ten years from now. From the software you use for work to the hardware you have with you now. From the devices you use at home to the means you use to get from A to B. The world is changing ever faster. But can we keep up? Welcome to the Supernova! Welcome to the Supernova In his book 'Thank you for being late', journalist and publicist Thomas Friedman gives dozens examples of just how fast technological change is accelerating. Take Apple's iPhone. Released…

Technische schuld, of Technical debt, is één van de grootste frustraties van de Development Teams waar ik mee werk. De meeste teams steken meteen van wal wanneer je vraagt om voorbeelden van technische schuld in hun codebase. Dan heb ik het over work-arounds, moeilijk te lezen code, tijdelijke-maar-niet-heus oplossingen en andere hacks die op korte termijn een probleem oplossen, maar op langere termijn voor hoofdpijn zorgen. Development Teams zijn zich zeer bewust van de opbouw van technische schuld, maar voelen zich vaak machteloos om er wat aan te veranderen. Het lukt ze niet om goed uit te leggen waarom het…

In a previous post I talked about the 'case of the missing users & customers in Scrum'. While there's a lot of focus (also thanks to DevOps) on 'shipping fast', we often forget that 'shipping fast' and 'building what the user needs' are two sides of the same coin. It's wonderful to ship fast. But without actively involving the user, it is nothing more than a technical exercise. How can we build good products if we never talk or see real-life users? In this post I offer 7 powerful ways to make this kind of interaction happen (directly and indirectly)…

In this post I would like to share my experiences on how to best Kickstart, Lift-off or Launch a (new) Scrum Team. Over the years, and many, many teams later, I've learned that a good start makes for half the work. Sending people to a Scrum Training, putting them together as a new Scrum Team, and expecting general awesomeness to follow is unrealistic. Scrum is all about self-organizing teams that frequently deliver working software. Just putting people together is not going to make them a team nor self-organizing. Teamwork is all about collaboration, (psychological) safety and playing on each others…

Scrum is about shipping fast(er). But it is also about building what the customer needs. These are two sides of the same coin. Although the former is often at the forefront of attention (also thanks to DevOps), the latter is frequently forgotten. Think about it; how often do you have real customers or real users present during Sprint Reviews? How often do developers talk with real customers and users? Although I understand why, this is not helped by the the official Scrum Guide. It has exactly zero references to ‘customers’ or ‘users’, and abstracts them away behind the business…